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FlankingEdit

Flanking is a relational status effect - that is, a character may flank another creature, or may be flanked by another creature.

You are flanking an enemy when you and an ally are both threatening that enemy and are on opposite sides of it. While you are flanking an enemy, you gain advantage against it.

ConcealmentEdit

When you are concealed, you are hidden from view.

Partial ConcealmentEdit

When you have partial concealment, creatures suffer a -2 penalty to spot you or perform ranged attacks against you, and you gain a +2 bonus to Stealth checks. It is possible to have partial concealment from some creatures and not others - for example, if you are standing next to a translucent rice-paper wall, you have partial concealment against creatures on the other side of the wall, but not against creatures on the same side of the wall as you.

Total ConcealmentEdit

When you have total concealment, creatures suffer a -5 penalty to spot you or perform any attacks against you, and you gain a +5 bonus to Stealth checks. It is possible to be hidden from some creatures and not others - for example, if you are in total darkness, you have total concealment from creatures that rely on normal vision to see, but not against creatures with darkvision.

HiddenEdit

When you are hidden, you have total concealment. Additionally, creatures who wish to perform ranged attacks against you must guess what space you are in before making the attack; if they target the wrong space, the attack automatically misses. It is possible to be hidden from some creatures and not others - for example, if you are invisible, you are hidden from creatures that rely on normal vision to see, but not against creatures with blindsight.

ProneEdit

When you are prone, you are lying on the ground. Being prone is considered a stance, so if you are knocked prone you automatically end any other stance you were in. You may choose to enter the prone stance voluntarily as an immediate action. Unlike other stances, you do not make checks to maintain the stance if you take damage, and effects which would force you to end a stance do not cause you to stop being prone unless they explicitly say so - once you are prone you stay prone until you can stand back up.

While you are prone, you grant advantage to all adjacent creatures and may not shift, but gain a +2 bonus to all defenses vs. ranged attacks. You suffer a -2 penalty to attacks and cannot gain advantage. You may crawl half your speed as a move action, or may stand up as a move action to end the prone stance.

WeakenedEdit

While you are weakened, your speed is halved, and you deal half damage with any attack. At the end of each turn, you may make an Endurance check to shrug it off.

SlowedEdit

While you are slowed, each space of movement costs double. Most effects that slow a creature for more than one turn allow that creature to make an Endurance check to shrug it off at the end of each turn.

ImmobilizedEdit

While you are immobilized, you cannot move, and forced movement effects cannot move you. At the end of each turn, you may make an Athletics or Acrobatics check to break free.

RestrainedEdit

While you are restrained, your speed is reduced to 0, you suffer a -2 penalty to all attacks, and you grant advantage to all enemies. At the end of each turn, you may make an Athletics or Acrobatics check to break free.

GrabbedEdit

A grab is a relational status effect - that is, a character may grab another creature, or may be grabbed by another creature.

While you are grabbed, your speed is reduced to 0, you suffer a -2 penalty to all attacks, and you grant advantage to all enemies except the creature who grabbed you. At the end of each turn, you may make an Athletics VS Fortitude or Acrobatics VS Reflex check to break free.

While you are grabbing another creature, you must use at least one arm to maintain the grab, and must remain adjacent to the grabbed creature or release the grab. As a move action, you may move up to one pace, then pull the grabbed creature into an adjacent space.

RegenerationEdit

When you have regeneration, you regain that many hit points at the start of each of your turns if you start your turn with 1 or more hit point.

Ongoing DamageEdit

Certain attacks might cause you to suffer from ongoing damage. At the end of each turn that you suffer from an ongoing damage effect, you make an Endurance check to shrug it off, then suffer any remaining effects. Until you shrug the effect off, you grant advantage while suffering from an ongoing damage effect.

BleedingEdit

Many weapon attacks - especially piercing and slashing weapons - deal bleeding damage. Bleeding deals untyped ongoing damage each turn until you shrug it off.

PetrificationEdit

Some magical attacks deal ongoing petrification damage each turn until you shrug it off or dispel the effect. If you critically fail your attempt to shrug off or dispel a petrification effect, you are petrified.

If you fail an attempt to shrug off or dispel ongoing petrification damage while you are wounded, you become slowed. If you are already wounded and slowed, you become immobilized and gain resistance to all damage. If you are already wounded and immobilized, you are petrified.

PetrifiedEdit

When you are fully petrified creature, you are unaware of your surroundings and may perform no actions or responses of any kind. You are resistant to all damage and gain a +10 bonus to all defenses.

AcidEdit

Some magical attacks deal ongoing acid damage each turn until you shrug it off or dispel the effect.

PoisonEdit

Some attacks - including the bites or stings of many creatures - deal ongoing poison damage each turn until you shrug it off. Certain poisons will cause secondary status effects as well, such as weakened or blinded. Unless otherwise specified, these conditions end when you shrug off the ongoing damage.

FireEdit

When you are on fire, you take ongoing fire damage until you shrug it off. If the fire was magical in nature, you may instead attempt to dispel the ongoing damage rather than shrug it off. While you are on fire, you may not attempt to hide or otherwise benefit from total concealment in any way.

MarkedEdit

A Mark is a relational status effect - that is, a character may mark another creature, or may be marked by another creature.

When you are marked by a creature, you suffer some kind of penalty or punishment when you do attack creatures other than the one marking you; the nature of that penalty or punishment depends on the effect that marked you.

DominatedEdit

Domination is a relational status effect - that is, a character may dominate another creature, or may be dominated by another creature.

When you are dominated by a creature, that creature controls your actions. He may choose a single at-will standard action, move action or immediate action to perform during each of your turns. You may perform no other actions while you remain dominated.

BlindedEdit

When you blinded, you suffer a -10 penalty to your Spot defense and to all Perception checks, grant advantage to all creatures, and all creatures gain total concealment against you.

DeafenedEdit

When you are deafened, you suffer a -5 penalty to your Spot defense and to all Perception checks, and automatically fail any checks to notice sounds.

SurprisedEdit

When you are surprised, you grant advantage to all creatures whose initiative rolls for the encounter are higher than your own, and may not perform immediate action or free action responses to any other character's action. You normally lose surprise as soon as your next turn begins. Some encounters will begin with one side or the other surprised, based on actions taken before or during the start of the encounter.

DazedEdit

When you are dazed, you may only take one standard action per turn, may not take any action outside your own turn, and grant advantage to all creatures. You end any voluntary stance you were in.

StunnedEdit

When you are stunned, you may only take a single free action on your turn. You may not take any other actions or responses except for automatic reactions, and you grant advantage to all creatures. You end any voluntary stance you were in.

HelplessEdit

When you are helpless, you may not take any actions or responses except for automatic reactions. You grant advantage to all creatures, and are vulnerable to coup de grace attacks. You end any voluntary stance you were in.

UnconsciousEdit

When you are unconscious, you are helpless and unaware of your surroundings. You may not take any actions or responses except for automatic reactions, grant advantage to all creatures, and are vulnerable to coup de grace attacks. You end any voluntary stance you were in and fall prone.

BloodiedEdit

You are bloodied whenever you have only half of your hit points remaining or less, and remain bloodied until your hit points rise above half your maximum. Certain tactics and conditions are affected by the bloodied condition.

DyingEdit

When you are dying, you are unconscious, and may not take any actions or responses except for automatic reactions. You grant advantage to all creatures, end any voluntary stance you were in and fall prone, and are vulnerable to coup de grace attacks. Additionally, you must make an Endurance save each turn to stabilize. If you lose your last point of vitality while you are dying, you are dead.

DeadEdit

A dead character can perform no actions or responses.

Forced MovementEdit

Forced movement is an instantaneous status effect - that is, you resolve it immediately as you apply it. Forced movement allows you to move another creature about the battlefield.

PushEdit

When you push a creature, you immediately move it up to that number of paces. Each space that you move it through must be further away from the origin of the pushing effect than the previous space.

PullEdit

When you pull a creature, you immediately move it up to that number of paces. Each space that you move it through must be close to the origin of the pulling effect than the previous space.

SlideEdit

When you slide a creature, you immediately move it up to that number of paces in any direction you wish.

FlingEdit

When you fling a creature, you immediately move it that number of paces. Each space that you move it through must be further away from the origin of the flinging effect than the previous space. If you fling a creature into a space adjacent to a solid obstacle or another small or larger creature, you may immediately end the forced movement and deal 1d6 falling damage per space of forced movement that you had remaining from the fling effect.

AdvantageEdit

Advantage is a relational status effect - that is, a character may grant advantage to another creature, or may have advantage against another creature.

You have advantage against a creature when that creature cannot see you, when you have an ally flanking that creature, or when it is suffering from certain other status effects.

If you have advantage against a creature, you gain a +2 advantage bonus to all attacks against that creature. Additionally, certain feats and situations exploit advantage.

VulnerabilityEdit

Vulnerability is the opposite of Resistance. When you have vulnerability to a damage type, you automatically take the maximum possible damage from any effect of that damage type - treat the attack as if it rolled the maximum possible result on each damage die when applying your damage only. Additionally, the attack is automatically considered a critical hit.

If two effects would grant you vulnerability and resistance to a damage type, the vulnerability and resistance cancel out - treat all damage of that type as normal. If you would gain vulnerability to a damage type you have immunity to, you are considered to have resistance to that damage type instead.

ResistanceEdit

Resistance is the opposite of vulnerability, and a weaker form of immunity. When you have resistance to a damage type, you reduce all damage of that damage type by half. If the effect achieves a critical hit or inflicts a condition, ignore the critical hit or condition, but also ignore your resistance - the two effectively cancel out.

If two effects would grant you vulnerability and resistance to a damage type, the vulnerability and resistance cancel out - treat all damage of that type as normal. On the other hand, if two different effects each grant you resistance to the same damage type, they do not combine into immunity - you merely continue to have resistance.

ImmunityEdit

Immunity is a stronger form of resistance. When you have immunity to a damage type, you reduce all damage of that damage type to zero, and ignore any status effects that would be applied from a damaging effect that deals that damage type. If the effect achieves a critical hit or inflicts an arcane affliction, ignore the critical hit or affliction, but reduce your immunity to resistance instead.

If you would gain vulnerability to a damage type you have immunity to, you are considered to have resistance to that damage type instead.

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